Monday, 28 September 2015

Spectactular fossils of the Green River Formation

Large teeth and rear-placed fins make Phareodus encaustus well suited for catching and eating other fish.
Rocks of the Green River Formation contain a story of what the environment was like about 50 million years ago in what is now parts of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

Streams draining the steep and newly formed mountains carried large amounts of sand, silt, mud and dissolved minerals into lakes that occupied the intermountain basis. Over time the sand, silt and mud began infilling the lakes. Abundant plants grew on broad swampy areas that developed around the margins of the lakes.

This 5.5 inch long bat is the most primitive known.
Claws on each finger of its wings indicate it was probably an agile climber and crawled along and under tree branches searching for insects.
A lagerstätte is a sedimentary rock unit with fossil content. The Green River swamps and lakes provided an exceptional environment for fossil formation.

The lakes and swamps were calm where remains were quickly buried by sediment. This resulted in one of Earth's most spectacular deposits of preserved plants, animals, insects and fish.

This 1.7 meter (5 foot 6 inch) softshell turtle is one of the largest turtles from Fossil Lake. During the Eocene, trionychid turtles reached maximum size.

This fully-articulated early horse is an extremely rare find.

The insect fossils from Fossil Lake sometimes show color patterns, wing venation, and sex-related characteristics.

Palm Tree Flower
Turritella Agate is the name used for a brown, translucent, fossiliferous agate found in the Green River Formation of Wyoming. It is easy to recognize because it contains large fossil snails that stand out in a white-to-tan color that contrasts with the brownish agate.

This organic gem material was incorrectly named decades ago when the christener thought that the spectacular spiral-shaped gastropod (snail) fossils entombed within the stone were members of the marine Turritella genus. That was an error. The fossils are of the freshwater snail, Elimia tenera, a member of the Pleuroteridae family.

See ----->
See ----->
See ----->

Friday, 18 September 2015

Crater of Diamonds State Park "Esperanza Diamond"

Mike Botha, a master diamond cutter with Embee Diamonds, is headed to Little Rock, Arkansas to work with the Esperanza diamond.

The Esperanza is an 8.52 carat diamond that was found in the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas.
He got a chance to peer into the heart of the uncut diamond last week, using special equipment. He said it appears to be completely colourless. "This could be potentially, a flawless diamond."

It is icicle-shaped, so he had to come up with a unique design to maximize the beauty of this particular diamond. He said the baseline value for the Esperanza is $200,000, but it could go much higher.
The Crater of Diamonds is a 911 acre state park in Murfreesboro, Arkansas that contains a 37.5 acre plowed field in which visitors can literally dig for diamonds.

It's the world's only diamond-bearing site that's accessible to the public.
The largest diamond ever discovered in the US, the 40.23-carat Uncle Sam, was found there in 1924. It was cut twice, resulting in a final 12.42-carat (2.484 g) M-color, VVS1 clarity emerald-cut diamond. In 1971, the Uncle Sam was sold for $150,000.

See ----->
See ----->
See ----->




Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Yowah Opal

Yowah is a small town in outback western Queensland, Australia. Yowah is located 938 kilometres west of Brisbane and 132 kilometres west of Cunnamulla. The 2006 census revealed a population of 142.

The town is famous for its opal mining and numerous opal fields that lie around the town as well as the "Yowah Nut" a local type of opal distinctive to the region. The area was first leased in 1883 to perspective settlers and opal mining has been the main activity ever since.

The Yowah field is an occurrence of opal in siliceous ironstone nodules generally referred to as Yowah Nuts. These nuts have a spherical or ellipsoidal shape, and show alternate bands of light- and dark-brown siliceous ironstone. There is sometimes a kernel of precious opal, which is the main source of the gem.

The nuts are found in layers (150–600mm in thickness) at depths up to 20m in a ferruginous sandstone, and are commonly associated with mudstone fragments or clay pellets.

See ----->
See -------->
See -------->

Tuesday, 15 September 2015

2016 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350

The all-new Shelby GT350 picks up where the Boss 302 left off, with more power, performance, and poise. Power comes from its naturally aspirated 5.2-liter flat-plane-crank V-8 producing 526 hp and 429 lb-ft.

A six-speed manual is the sole transmission; a Torsen rear diff is also standard. Giant brakes promise eye-popping deceleration while magnetic ride control keeps handling and ride sharp yet civilized.

Adjustable chassis settings are available in every GT350 and GT350R.
There are five modes—Normal, Sport, Weather, Track, and Drag—that act on the accelerator response, the traction- and stability-control system, steering effort, magnetorheological dampers, exhaust system, and launch-control program.
The GT350R’s 19-inch carbon-fiber wheels are said to save 60 pounds total over the aluminum ones fitted to the GT350. Light enough to lift with one hand—approximately 18 pounds each—the carbon wheels are finished in gloss black.

Measuring 11 inches wide in the front and 11.5 inches wide at the back, the wheels wear Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires (305/30 front and 315/30 rear) that were specially engineered for the GT350R.

Estimated Base Price: $63,500