Thursday, 20 October 2016

Ancient Indian artifacts find their way home from Australia

Three more ancient artifacts have been returned to India from Australia. Most of the pieces in Australia have been acquired from the New York gallery of smuggler Subhash Kapoor.

It is more than four years since Subhash Kapoor was arrested and extradited to India. As recently as July 4, the National Gallery of Australia was talking about returning two of its artefacts following fresh evidence of links to the 68-year-old, once accused of “having created a black-market Sotheby’s”.
A sandstone stele of Rishabhanata from the 10th century
The highlight of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to America were the return to India of over 200 stolen artifacts, many of them linked to Kapoor. In September 2014, then Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott returned a 900-year-old Shiva sculpture. In October 2015, German Chancellor Angela Merkel returned a 10th-century Durga idol stolen from Kashmir.

Over 30 years, Kapoor is believed to have traded in hundreds of antiques, including statues and paintings, now believed to be stolen. His gallery, Art of the Past, was located at the heart of Manhattan’s art circle.

Subhash Kapoor

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Monday, 17 October 2016

Ancient Gold coins top $3.4 million CNG auction

Gold oktadrachm of Antiochos III circa 222–187 BC, Seleukid Empire. Sold for $77,350 in VF
Classical Numismatic Group’s sale 103 produced top results. Their September auction hammered $2,826,186 on a pre-sale estimate of $1,992,300, for a clearance rate of 98.30 percent.
Gold Stater. Kroisos, c. 561-546 BC. $ 71,000
Gold aureus of Pertinax. He reigned as Emperor for just 86 days in 193 C.E. before being murdered by his Praetorian guard. EF $56,525. A very rare Qing dynasty pattern gold liang made $49,980.
A superb gold medal of Charles II struck for presentation to naval officers who distinguished themselves in the 1665 Battle of Lowestoft. No more than five examples are known. $ 50,000

Saturday, 15 October 2016

Ancient jewellery - Christies

A pair of Etruscan gold ear studs. C. 530-500 BC. Estimate: $30,000-50,000. Standout pieces from the Antiquities sale at Christie’s New York on 25 October.
A Greek gold olive wreath. Late classical period to early hellenistic. Estimate: $250,000-350,000.

A Celtic gold torque. C. late 4th century BC. Estimate: $120,000-180,000.

Eight Sarmatian Gold Phalerae circa 1st century B.C. Est. $ 12,000

3 Celtic gold finger rings. Late 4th century. Estimate USD 60,000 - USD 90,000

Viking gilt silver pendant. 10th century.Estimate USD 8,000 - USD 12,000
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Thursday, 13 October 2016

World's Most Expensive Necklaces

Chopard Magnificent Diamond and Emerald Necklace - Necklace features 191 carats of emeralds, set between 16 carats of diamonds. Price: $3m.

De Beers’ Marie Antoinette Necklace features more than 181 carats of diamonds, including a monster 8 carat, pear-shaped white diamond as a centerpiece. All of the jewels are set in platinum. $ 3.7m

Neil Lane’s Diamond Necklace features 140 carats of pear-shaped, cushion-shaped and teardrop-shaped diamonds, set in platinum $4m.

Diamond Pendant Necklace by Christie’s sold at an auction in 2001. Pear diamond weighs 47.49 carats. $4.8m

James W. Currens the Red Scarlet necklace was sold for $5.1 million in 2012.

The “Mrs. Winston”: $5.8 Million

The Etcetera Burmese Ruby necklace became the most expensive ruby-based necklace of all time when it sold for $6.4 in 2013.

Christie’s Diamond Necklace. 52 round diamonds weighing a total of 104.84 carats sold for $8.14m 2013.

Leviev’s Vivid Yellow Diamond Pendant. 77.12 carat vivid yellow diamond with a string of white diamonds, the asking price is set at $10m.
Garrard’s Heart of the Kingdom Ruby necklace features as its centerpiece a nearly 41-carat, super rare, heart-shaped Burma ruby.

The brilliant stone is surrounded by more than 150 diamonds. $14m

Winston’s version of the Heart of the Ocean Diamond necklace with a real blue diamond of 15 carats. $ 20m
The Hutton-Mdivani necklace by Cartier sold for $27.4 million, a world record for a Cartier jewel.

For hundreds of years, jadeite has been a symbol of supreme status and wealth and this stunning bead necklace is undeniably one of the best examples of its type in the world. It was last offered on the market in 1994 and fetched $2m – a record at the time for a piece of jadeite jewellery.
The most expensive necklace ever made is estimated to be worth $55 million.

The jewelry, known as L'Incomparable, features a large yellow stone suspended from a rose gold setting with 90 white diamonds and weighs 637 carats in total.

The necklace was made by luxury jeweler Mouawad and features a yellow, internally flawless diamond weighing 407 carats with 90 white diamonds weighing nearly 230 carats. The rough stone was found in a pile of mining tailings by a young girl in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Untouched ancient burial chamber found in Turkey’s Muğla

A burial chamber dating back to 2,400 years ago was unearthed at a construction site in the southwestern province of Muğla’s Milas district. Officials found 103 artifacts in the burial chamber, untouched and unlooted for millennia.
The burial chamber was unearthed close to the holy road between the city of Mylasa, which was the capital of the Karia region in the ancient era, and the Labraunda religious center. A settlement had been existing at the site for 2,600 years.

The region of western Anatolia extending along the coast from mid-Ionia (Mycale) south to Lycia and east to Phrygia. It was colonized by Ionian and Dorian Greeks forming Greek-dominated states there.
The inhabitants of Caria, known as Carians, had arrived long before the Greeks.

Gümüşkesen chambered tomb monument in Milas, built during the city's Roman Period

In the southern Turkish province of Adana’s Yumurtalık district, a rare mosaic depicting the ancient Greek god of the sea, Poseidon. It is believed to date back to the 3rd or 4th century B.C.

Monday, 10 October 2016

Grave of ‘Griffin Warrior’ at Pylos

The grave of a Mycenaean warrior uncovered last year in Pylos in the southwest of Greece was that of a warrior in his mid-30s who died around 1500 B.C. Buried with him were some 2,000 objects, including silver cups, beads made of precious stones, ivory combs, a sword and four intricately decorated solid gold rings.

The discovery of the “Griffin Warrior” offers evidence that Mycenaean culture recognized and appreciated Minoan culture. The man's rings are made of multiple sheets of gold and depict very detailed scenes and iconography straight out of Minoan mythology. The rings probably come from Crete where they were used to place seals on documents or objects.
Archaeologists digging at Pylos, an ancient city on the southwest coast of Greece, discovered the rich grave of a warrior who was buried at the dawn of European civilization.

Archaeologists expressed astonishment at the richness of the find and its potential for shedding light on the emergence of the Mycenaean civilization, the lost world of Agamemnon, Nestor, Odysseus and other heroes described in the epics of Homer.
The tomb is said to be the the most complete Greek find of its kind since the 1950s. The find includes gold, silver, ivory, and bronze artifacts, as well as engraved gemstones and an ornate ivory-and gilt-hilted sword.

The warrior was buried around 1500 B.C., next to the site on Pylos on which, many years later, arose the palace of Nestor, a large administrative center that was destroyed in 1180 B.C., about the same time as Homer’s Troy.

The palace was part of the Mycenaean civilization; from its ashes, classical Greek culture arose several centuries later.

A bronze mirror with an ivory handle

An ivory comb